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This is Part 2 of installing SCVMM 2012 SP1 on virtual cluster and on Hyper-v Cluster hosts.

Part 1 can be found from here

Let’s review what we have installed.

We have installed File server which provides Quorum disks. We have created AD components and two VMM virtual servers.

We have installed Failover features on VMM servers and all other prerequisites.

Let’s start the Part 2 with Create a Cluster on VMM servers.

Start Failover manager and Validate a cluster first (if you don’t do this step, the creation wizard will also do it)

 

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Now, with any clusters, a heartbeat network is required. Since our VMMs will sit on same Hyper-v Host, so what I need is to build a new Virtual Switch called Heartbeat.

Notice:

If you want to join these two Hyper-v hosts in the future, you must have EXACTLY same virtual network settings on both Hyper-v hosts. Therefore, a internal switch or private switch is NO NO for cluster. You have to build External switches with same name on both Hyper-v Hosts.

 

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Once this is done, add a new virtual Nic on VMM and connect to heartbeat switch.

SNAGHTML1c00f2

 

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Configure Heartbeat IP on both VMMs

 

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You also make sure you have create DNS A records for this cluster and also VMM app cluster.

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With Windows 2012 Cluster, we can actually use share folder as quorum.

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Install VMM 2012 SP1

Well, most jobs are done. Here is the final installation.

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System automatically detects you are on cluster. so click Yes.

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Yes, it’s installed on C drive.

 

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Oops, I didn’t setup enough start up memory on this VMM vm.

I went back and made adjustment.

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Be aware to make sure svc_vmmadmin has rights to create DB on your SQL database server.

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Make sure VMMCLU01 exists in your DNS server.

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The location of AD can be found via ADSI EDIT. Just found the OU like this

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DOn’t do that now, you are on cluster.

 

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Now, do the same thing on the other VMM VM. Most critical settings are already setup.

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Once the wizard go through, you installed VMM on cluster successfully.

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This is the end of this post. There will be other posts soon talking about how to configure VMM 2012 SP1.


Just run into this issue and tried to connect iSCSI disk to Win2012 cluster. No matter how hard I tried, it just disappear from Failover manager.
I googled it and found this

What types of drives can I use with Storage Spaces?

You can use commodity drives attached via Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS), Serial ATA (SATA), or USB. Storage layers that abstract the physical disks are not compatible with Storage Spaces. This includes VHDs and pass-through disks in a virtual machine, and storage subsystems that layer a RAID implementation on top of the physical disks. iSCSI and Fibre Channel controllers are not supported by Storage Spaces.
RAID adapters, if used, must be in non-RAID mode with all RAID functionality disabled. Such adapters must not abstract the physical disks, cache data, or obscure any attached devices including enclosure services provided by attached just-a-bunch-of-disks (JBOD) devices. Storage Spaces is compatible only with RAID adapters that support completely disabling all RAID functionality.
Yes, in Windows Server 2012 you are able to leverage Clustered Spaces only for SAS connected JBODs.

To explain the philosophy/rationale behind this: In Windows 8 (equally applicable to Windows Server 2012), Storage Spaces enables delivery of a new category of highly capable storage solutions at dramatically lower price-points & maximized operational simplicity. In doing so, we have strived to ensure a predictably consistent usage experience (irrespective of storage component hardware failures) while delivering excellent performance. Our internal testing exposed complex interactions when combining Spaces with “storage arrays” connected via iSCSI and/or FC. Therefore, for Windows 8 (Windows Server 2012), we are constraining Spaces based deployments to SAS connected JBODs (for business critical deployments), and SATA/USB connected disks (for home/enthusiast/small-business customers).

 

Stand by for answer from Microsoft

 

Update:

I have found solution how to connect iSCSI server to VMM, but not via cluster though. I will write a new post about how to do it. However, still waiting for MS reply regarding this interesting thing.

Reference:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/11382.storage-spaces-frequently-asked-questions-faq.aspx


With fresh installation of Windows 2012 and Windows 8, you can’t access old SMB share or CIFS share correct.

The solution is following.

· To enable SMBv1 on the SMB client, run the following commands:

· sc.exe config lanmanworkstation depend= bowser/mrxsmb10/mrxsmb20/nsi

· sc.exe config mrxsmb10 start= auto

· To enable SMBv2 and SMBv3 on the SMB client, run the following commands:

· sc.exe config lanmanworkstation depend= bowser/mrxsmb10/mrxsmb20/nsi

· sc.exe config mrxsmb20 start= auto

 

 

 

Run following Powershell command to disable new security negotiate on SMB 3 which some third party doesn’t support. 

Be aware once you disable this security negotiate, you need to disable all Windows 8 and Windows 2012 in your environment so they can talk to each other.

 

Set-SmbClientConfiguration -RequireSecuritySignature $false

Or

Set-ItemProperty -Path “HKLM:\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanWorkstation\Parameters” RequireSecureNegotiate -Value 0 -Force


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Last week, I presented my design chart of my Lab. Today, I’m going to build SCVMM2012 cluster on Virtual Machine. In another word, this post will also show you how to build Virtual Cluster on Hyper-V.

Environment:

Physical Host:

Before you start, you need to make sure that you have at least one Hyper-v Host available. You will also need a windows File Server which will provide quorum disk for your vmm cluster. You can use a virtual file server(Windows 2012) but I have a physical box.

Clearly, you need a virtual SQL server as database source.

Virtual Machine:

Since we are building cluster, so you will need to VMs which I install Windows 2012 on that. Each VM has 2 nics. One is heartbeat and the other is for production and management.

What you will install on VMM01 and VMM02:

  • AD Preparation

Create two user accounts, svc_vmm and svc_vmmadmin

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  • Configure distributed Key Management (DKM)

DKM is critical for VMM which stores encryption key for both VMM servers to access.

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grant Vmmadmins rights for this AD  object

 

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  • Install Windows 2012 Standard version

Build windows 2012

Add IP address

Join VM into domain

Turn off Firewall

Enable Remote Desktop

Disable IE security

Disable UAC

test remote winrs /r:vmm01 ipconfig

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  • Add SCVMM accounts into local Administrator groups

You must add those two accounts separately.

Please DO NOT create a group and put users into group and put group into local administrator group, because it won’t work!

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  • Install Failover Manager
  • Install .NET Framework 3.5 Feature

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When you install that, be aware you need to have Windows 2012 ISO or CD ready like following

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You instruct installation application where to find source code, otherwise, it will fail.

Tip:

You will be surprised that how many features actually coded base on 3.5 rather than 4.1. This is one of “must install” for me every time I install a VM.

  • Install Windows ADK for Windows 8

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  • Install SQL Native Client (I’m using SQL 2008 R2 SP1)
  • Install SQL Command Line Utilities

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Build windows 2012 File Server

A file server is important for cluster. As cluster, you need a quorum disk which can be accessed by all members of cluster so they can exchange data, voting etc. You can have a NAS or SAN blah,blah, but the cheapest way is to use a free windows Server to provide shared folder. Windows 2012 cluster has this capability to use this share folder as quorum storage, thank for SMB 3.0 which allows multiple accesses at same time.

By saying that, we can also build iSCSI features on both File server and VMM01,02. No additional software required, Windows 2012 will allow us to have a iSCSI storage. I will write another post about it.

Let’s install

Make sure you have these service installed on your windows File server.

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You will also need a separated physical disk attached to file server.

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Once you have this physical disk, you can build a new storage Pool.

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Now, I have storage Pool, I will start build a virtual disk on the pool.

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You will also need to build another virtual disk for storing VMs as to be used by VMMLibrary Role later on.

Now, you need to install Share feature.

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Once that’s done, Let’s come back and share the quorum

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don’t need anything here for quorum

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However, we do need permission to be added here. You need to add svc_vmm, svc_vmmadmin and also two VMM computer AD objects.

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I’m not going to repeat similar steps here.

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With this File server, you can also build quorum for Hyper-v Hosts as well.

 

To be continued….


topology of scvmm

 

 

This is the test environment I currently have. I will write a series of posts of how to build this environment and issues I have encountered along the way.

Essentially, this lab involves following physical hosts.

2 Hyper-v 3 servers, 1 ESXi and 1 file server.

The rest of them are all VMs with Windows 2012.

VMM01,VMM02, clustered

SQL03 (windows 2008 R2, SQL 2008 R2 )

APPV01 (App-v Server)

VCE01 (vCenter 5.1)

Plus with some DCs which are not included in this diagram.

Most posts will come. Please be patient.


I understand there are quiet few articles regarding monitoring Memory status of Hyper-v. But I would still prefer to write down at least you don’t need to dig around again.

Hyper-v memory status is one of critical parameter you would always focus on.

If it was in Vmware, you would use Vmware embedded performance monitoring to see how much memory your host has and how much your VM takes.

You can do that either from vCenter or ESXi (esxtop).

With Microsoft Hyper-V, you can use following solutions.

  1. Hyper-v manager
  2. Powershell on Hyper-v Host
  3. Performance monitor on Hyper-v Host
  4. PAL analyse result of Performance Monitor
  5. SCOM
  6. SCVMM

 

Hyper-V is using Dynamic memory to allocate physical memory to VM. Instead of like Vmware which uses balloon, sharing to “work around” on optimizing memory usaging, Hyper-V simply just gives memory or take it back since it’s Microsoft Product.

Hyper-v Manager

 

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The startup RAM is related with smartpage. If there is not enough physical memory available in host, Hyper-V will use SmartPage to use storage as memory to start machine.

Minimum RAM is guaranteed memory server assign this VM. As you know, with Dynamic memory, host does take memory back from VM when VM doesn’t need it. but host won’t take memory below minimum RAM.

Maximum RAM should be reasonable memory a VM may need.

Memory buffer is how much memory increases at time.

 

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From above picture, the Assigned Memory is actually important. that’s how much memory a physical host has assigned to a VM but it doesn’t mean that’s how much VM believes it has.

For example, a VM can have 8GB memory but assigned memory could be 512MB. This case is important when host try to retrieve memory from VM. With dynamic Memory, when you increase memory on VM, you will see total physical memory from VM increase. but when host takes memory back, it won’t decrease that figure from VM.

 

Powershell on Hyper-v Host

 

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Performance monitoring on Hyper-v

 

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PAL analyse result of Performance Monitor

 

You can also download PAL

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Generate Hyper-v performance monitor template

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Import template to performance monitor and start monitoring for certain time, import result back to PAL

 

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You will get report like this

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SCOM and SCVMM is not discussed in this post.

But you can check out following reference to get more details.

 

 

 

Reference:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/haroldwong/archive/2013/03/26/server-virtualization-series-performance-management-memory.aspx

 

http://blogs.technet.com/b/haroldwong/archive/2013/03/08/hyper-v-2012-dynamic-memory-what-does-the-vm-think-it-has-versus-what-it-really-has.aspx

 

http://blogs.technet.com/b/chrisavis/archive/2013/03/06/monitoring-dynamic-memory.aspx


This Post is introducing Hyper-V VM to everyone. What’s Hyper-v 2010 VM components and what Hyper-v 2012 can do in vMotion.

Test environment:

Hosts:

Testhyp01, Testhyp02

Windows 2012

VM:

TestWin12-01

Hyper-v VM components

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This is best to describe what components a VM would have.

VHDX File

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This is main disk file which contains all data, similar to vmdk file. The vhdx is the new format while the old format is called vhd which MS strongly suggests you to upgrade to vhdx due to possible data corruption.

The size of file is depending on what kind of disk you are choosing. If you choose Dynamic disk, then it could be small file like less than 10GB.

 

AVHDX File

AVHDX is the snapshot of that VM which basically increases size every time when you write to your VM. MS strongly suggests DO NOT use snapshot but I found it comes quite handy. Especially, you can always vMotion it or storage vMotion snapshot with VM.

Configuration File

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This lovely xml file is using computer GUID as file name. Yes, GUID not the name of your VM. So basically, it makes me very hard to locate configuration since there is no option for me to see what VM GUID is from Hyper-v Manager.

Imaging if you put all vms’ configuration files in the same folder, how can you tell which one is which one? so the best practise here is to put each VM in the separated folder.

P.S: You do can move files around later on.

Here is Powershell which helps you to fetch GUID

Using PowerShell you can find which GUID belongs to which VM.

 

PS> get-vm | ft -autosize vmname, vmid

 

VMName                 VMId

——                 —-

… 2012 DC            a1e1ab6b-a595-4089-bd9d-ab2040f3f603

2008 R2 Cluster Node 1 dbee3803-bf07-423d-84b7-3e0f98fafe2c

2012 Cluster Node 1    f3f0f575-1f00-4b4a-a07d-eb674c771bb5

2012 Cluster Node 2    6d10d079-90b4-4366-abc7-8df9ab4b3c60

 

PS> get-vm -id 6d10d079-90b4-4366-abc7-8df9ab4b3c60 | ft -autosize vmname, vmid

 

VMName              VMId

——              —-

2012 Cluster Node 2 6d10d079-90b4-4366-abc7-8df9ab4b3c60

 

 

BIN File

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BIN file is basically VM memory dump file. It is sued to recover your VM from fast turn on and turn off. For example, if you restart your Hyper-v host without shutdown VMs running on it, you will find all VMs are still in last running status after reboot hyper-v host. It’s quite good feature. Again, the size of BIN is the size of memory you assigned to your VM or if you are using dynamic memory, then that’s how much system gives to it.

The funny thing about BIN is you can’t put it into separate folder away from your VM. If you review VM configuration file (XML file) you won’t find setting for BIN.

I think this is very important feature like Vmware swap file. You may want to collect all swap file in one location rather than attaching with VM so you will be able to estimate how big VM folder will be.

Well, you do can turn off BIN file though, by changing following settings to Option 2 and 3.

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Once you are done that, you will see the size of BIN is 0, but again, you loss that useful feature of saving VM state.

P.S: If you are using DC as VM, please do choose Option 3. You don’t want to mass up with AD from saving state.

Smart Paging File

Well, this is rarely used or even appear. This file will appear only there is no free memory available and you want to start your VM. The system will use disk as memory (Minimum memory setting of your VM) to start your VM.

vMotion and storage vMotion

There is no doubt that Vmware is first company starting using vMotion and storage vMotion. But MS is the first company using storage vMotion without cluster and share storage. I guess this is dramatically disturb Vmware’s plan and they also announce vSphere 5 can do the same thing.

Anyway, let’s briefly go through what Hyper-V does for vMotion and storage vMotion.

If you go to Hyper-v Manager, right click VM you want to move

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You get this interface.

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That’s right. There is no other option it’s just move. You can choose to move to different host or same host but different file location.

Let’s say if you choose option 1

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Type the other host name here

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If you choose Option 3

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That’s where you can choose destination location. Now, be aware that the destination folder need to have write permission and also permission to register VM into Hyper-v host.

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Please any feedback if you want. More posts are coming.


So one of most common software is Microsoft Office 2010. We all want that software be installed regardless it’s on physical machine or VDI. There are so many different options you can choose and you may face. This post is focusing on deploying Microsoft Office 2010 to VDI via App-V.

 

Why do we need to use App-V?

App-V allows user to steam down application parts which this app really needs when it runs. With VDI solution, if we don’t use App-V, we may install entire Office 2010 on each VDI VM and if you have 100 VDI VMs in your environment, it may use 200 or 300GB precious SAN space easily just for this software only. With tons of benefits of using App-V, I am not going to explain it too detail.

 

Why don’t people use App-V Office?

Well, reason No.1, it’s complicated. With using App-V, it involves so many different other technologies and all of them have to work together. Second reason is App-V still has some limitation with one app working other app since each App is supposing to work in it’s own sandbox. But this is going to change with App-v 5.0 sp1 and other tools to help you deploy office.

with no further ado, Let’s start

Environment introduction

Server:

Testhyp02: Windows 2012 with Hyper-v running on it, App-V Server & Management component has been installed. For more details, please to see my last post.

Workstation:

All workstations are VMs running on Hyper-v.

You will need to have at least two workstations.

VM1:

Windows 7 SP1, 32bit (As App-v Sequencing server to catch software installation)

VM2:

windows 7 SP1, 64bit ( As VDI template to run App-V software).

Note:

You must use Windows 7 with Service Pack 1 as client. Win7 without SP1 doesn’t support App-v Client. You must use 32bit for App-v Sequencing server since there are certain software which only has 32bit version!

Preparation for your VMs:

Now, I must ask you to focus on preparation of your VMs before you start installing.

  1. Build windows 7 32bit SP1 VM from scratch. (64bit if it is VM2)
  2. Make sure you have installed Integrated Service
  3. Make sure you have join the VM into your domain
  4. Disable firewall
  5. Create Install folder under c:\

 

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Notice: You need both 32bit and 64bit Powershell to install on VM1 and VM2.

6.    Install above software

7.    Download following software and put into c:\install\AppV Prep

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                 You need both 32bit and 64bit version of Deployment Kit

  • Office 2010 SP1 Professional Plus 32bit ISO (extract to a folder)
  • Office 2010 SP1 Profession Plus Volume License (XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX)
  • Microsoft Desktop Optimization Package (It contains App-V 5.0 sp1 non RDS client)
  • Microsoft Application virtualization 5.0 SP1 (from Volume License Portal)

 

 

You need to extract Office Deployment Kit to separated folder like above picture shows. Also extract Sequencing kit.

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Extract Office 2010 Professional Plus ISO (must be 32bit) to a folder. Only 32bit Office will work with integration and it can work on both 32bit and 64bit Win7.

Copy App-V_Seq_Kit into Office folder and also Deployment kit as well

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Deploy Office 2010 App-v Kit

There are lots of articles about it on the Internet. In this case, I’m using MAK to register.

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Few things about this deployment.

1. Must use elevated CMD to run this command

2. Must NOT USE Powershell to run, it won’t work

3. When it is running, don’t jump on Services.msc to check what’s New, it will crash the installation

 

So what this command does is to install a License service like KMS in local PC with Volume serial number of Office 2010 to make sure Office application works correctly.

After installation, you can open servcies.msc and see whether it works or not.

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Install App-V Sequence

Install App-V Sequence on VM1 which is running windows 7 sp1 32bit with “Other Tools” installed first. Add IP address, DNS, Join domain, disable firewall and copy all above software on the VM1.

You shouldn’t have issue to run App-V Sequence

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Run App-v Sequence and do following steps

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Add keys like following

Open the "Exclusion Items" tab and add the following: [{Common AppData}]\Microsoft\OfficeSoftwareProtectionPlatform [{Common AppData}]\Microsoft\Windows With Mapping Type = “VFS”

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Capture Office 2010 with Accelerate Package

Yes, you are very lucky that Microsoft has this accelerate package which does lots of work for you.

Now, it’s time to start App-v sequence

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If you don’t have AP, you have to capture office installation procedure and hope it’s clean capture!

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With AP helps, system all generate 3 copies of appv file with some modification in each. All what you need is the last version with integration embedded.

 

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Following is the first version.

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Continue to capture running parameters, do not run Sharepoint and Outlook components

 

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Now, start to integration procedure

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You need to be patient since VM1 is loading 1.5GB office installation appv file.

 

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Save as your package to new folder

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Deploy Office 2010 with App-v

Add your App-V package

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Setup connection group and grant domain users group permission to connect

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Setup Package access permission with domain users

 

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Log on Publishing port to test

If it is empty like below, then it’s time to run IISRESET on app-v server.

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check again

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Deploy on VDI client

This is VM2 which needs to install all “other tools” list above.

App-v client must be installed on this template machine which will be used to deploy VDI.

There are two typies of Client. with RDS and without RDS. With RDS version is used in Session Host. In this case, we use without RDS version.

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You also need to run Set-AppvClientconfiguration –EnablePackageScripts 1

 

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Wait for 5 mins, Office applications should be push down to this client

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Prepare VM for VDI

 

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Once you create new pool and deploy VM as VDI, the Office 2010 will just work. Winking smile

 

Please leave any feedback.

 

 

Reference:

How to sequence Microsoft Office 2010 in Microsoft Application Virtualization 5.0 using a Package Accelerator


I never expected it took me whole afternoon on just installing a App-V, well, I do admit I did went out for other stuff, but it is little ridiculous how complicated and lack of correct information the whole process is.

I write this post to help myself and others for future reference. If you do run into similar issue, hope this post can help.

Test Environment:

Windows 2012 runs HYPER-V on it

SQL 2008 R2 runs on Hyper-V

 

SQL Preparation:

This is the part which kills everyone. If you think you just jump on the SQL and create couple of DB and jump back and run installation wizard, then I can tell you will see following errors.

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This warning is telling you that you didn’t prepare DB as what Microsoft wanted and go back now!

Funny thing is it only has one button “OK”, no cancel?

 

If you continue to install, you will run into The error was : Invalid object name ‘dbo.RoleAssignments’ after you finish installation.

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The correct installation method is following kirxblog and prepare the DB.

Essentially, there are two methods to prepare DB. You can either bring installation disk on SQL server and run through installation wizard which requires you to install whole bunch of craps or you can manually install it as what this post will tell you.

1. get DB scripts ready

In terms of extract DB script, you need to find installation exe file and run it with /layout as parameter.

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Once you have done that, you will following structure

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2. Create 3 AD groups

Now, according to installation instruct of script, you need two groups which are read and write. I also create 3rd group called AppVAdmin for managing.

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You need to add App-V server computer account into AppvAdmin group. Also domain admins as well.

3. Modify DB scripts with Powershell script

The original DB script which you extracted from installation exe file requires SID of AD groups in terms of making it work! It’s not easy to find those SID and not mention other nasty stuff.

Thank for Kirx beautiful powershell script, we are able to prepare those DB scripts with Powershell script.

Instead of all other nasty information, all what you need to do is to provide name of groups and name of DBs. Powershell script will prepare the DB script and help you to finish the work.

download Kirx script and edit.

Found those lines and replace it

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If you never run powershell script on this serve, you may want to unlock it.

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Make backup for your DB scripts and copy them to c:\temp folder like this.

c:\temp\ManagementDatabase and also report database script.

Copy kirx script to c:\temp

Run it, if it works, it should return with no result.

However, it will change the file name under those DB scripts.

Original folder.

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Changed

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3. run the Scripts on DB

Copy your new script to SQL server and open management studio

Run 1-1 Database script which will create new DB on SQL

Run all other script base on DB you just created

 

4. Add AppvAdmin group to db.Ower on new DB

Your AppvAdmin group should contain App-V server account by now

 

Install Prerequisites for App-V

You need to download Microsoft C++ 2010 x86 version and install on App-V server. Yes, it is x86 not x64 version!

Otherwise, you will get this one.

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Install App-V

Now, we can start to see those fish eggs , oh, no, orange Apps in the Box

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Now, Unless you have SQL on your App-V box, otherwise, DO NOT tick those boxes. It will change your wizard steps.

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Once you finish installation, I strongly recommend you to restart your App-V and most likely, you just add computer account into AppvAdmin group and requires restart to take effect.

Otherwise, you may see this.

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After restart App-V, you should be able to this no error on console.

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Reference:

http://kirxblog.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/remote-database-preparation-for-app-v-5/


After poor marketing design vRAM past, Vmware has made another mistake on restricting of free license of ESXi. The free version of ESXi makes you only run VMs on host which has no more than 32GB memory.

This change (in my opinion, it’s also a wrong decision again!) pushes all customers from Vmware side to Microsoft side and also with no free licensing on Test and DR environment (which means you have to buy Essential Kits to cover Test and DR Hosts), we are facing no options but start to use Hyper-v in all tests environment.

One of most important elements of using Hyper-V is to convert existing VMWARE VMs to Hyper-V server.

MVMC (Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter) is one of tools you will use during the process of converting from Vmware vSphere to Microsoft HYPER-V.

Now, you will face some common issues and I hope this post will help you save some time.

My test environment:

1 Hyper-v Windows 2012 server

1 Vmware ESXi 4.1 with Windows 2008 R2 VMs

The goal is to convert VM from vmdk to VHD and up running in the Hyper-V

MVMC components:

MVMC actually has two parts.

1. MVMC to move VM with both CLI and GUI.

2. MVDC (virtual Disk Converter) to only convert disks from vmdk to VHD.

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Start MVMC

Now, if you run the MVMC Gui, you will get this interface,

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You are required to type ESXi or vCenter information here to get access to VM list. Behind the scene, What it does is to access ESXi web API to check VM lists on that ESXi.

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As you can see, here is where you select your VM to be converted. The BLUE exclamation mark indicates that VM can’t be converted. There are quite few reasons why a VM can’t be converted, but on this picture, State is “OFF” and another VM without Vmware Tools can’t be converted.

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Now, here is the interesting part. A login user can be used here directly, and notice it says Final State of VM is ON or OFF?

Again, it’s Final State of VM. It’s not all time states. so the original VM will be shutdown no matter what and it’s up to you to make it start again at the end.

If you want to convert VM on the fly without shutdown a VM, this is not the tool you should use.

Behind the scene, MVMC talks to ESXi to get snapshot of original VM while it’s running, the snapshot should include memory status as well. so estimate free size of VM storage.

Once snapshot is done, it removes Vmware tools and shutdown the VM. Then, it will export VM as OVF template which essentially isolate VM from hypervisor hardware layer. If your VM is a Microsoft TMG, then you probably don’t want to do that since TMG remembers the MAC of it’s nic and stored it in it’s own database. Now, there is a way to “hack” TMG, but this post doesn’t include it.

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But I strongly suggest to use a UNC with share to store VMs.

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This is where VM will sit. Now, according to Microsoft, it requires at least double the size of VM. As matter of fact, it requires triple size space rather than double.

Behind the scene, Like what I mentioned above, a OVF template has been generated. Now, OVF template is a compress format, so a 50GB vm can be compressed around 13GB. so this 13GB is downloaded to \\testhyp02\vmdk folder and MVMC will start convert it to 50GB vhd. After that, 50GB vhd will be copy (or upload) to Hyper-V VM location so that’s another 50GB, compressed if you use Dynamic disk. finally occupied Size is 13+50+50=113GB.

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Now, when you see this page, you are pretty happy that VM has been converted and insert into HYPER-V and up running.

Now, remember this is VM from OVF, so some clean up must be done.

install new version of Integrated Service.

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If you don’t install this integrated service, those hardware can’t be identified.

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It does warn you the OLD IP exists, but after overwritten IP, it seems working. If you want to show hidden device of that old NIC, you won’t be able to find it.

Now, What’s Wrong?

MVMC has used multiple Microsoft technology in terms of converting.

The most common error you will get is this.

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You can find log file here.

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Now, for Windows 2008 R2, I recommend you to do following steps.

1. Enable Winrm

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Winrm allows Windows server (2012 in this case) to remotely manage VM in terms of removing Vmware Tools.

2. Enable Server manager Remote management which will create FW fules

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3. Make sure FW rules exception is ticked

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3. You need to enable WMI and File and Print rules on FW no matter FW is on or OFF.

Now, after you have enable all three tricks, you can run some simple test.

For WINRM, you can run “winrs /r:yourTestServer ipconfig” from your MVMC server. If it shows result, then WINRM is working.

for WMI, you can download WMI administrator Tools and remote access root folder of VM, if you can see content, then it means it’s working.

Restart MVMC wizard and try again.

What about convert VM on the fly without shutdown ?

I’m not quite sure whether any software can do that at this stage. But You DO can clone a VM to an isolated network. run VM and import it to Hyper-V with MVMC.

For large size disk VM, you may want to use MVDC to convert disk and build a VM in Hyper-V and insert disk.

please let me know any thoughts.

 

Add-on:

following is answer from Microsoft for converting V2V on the fly.

Answer back from some of our Hyper-V guys…

 

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It’s “possible” to perform a P2V conversion on a VMware virtual machine using Virtual Machine Manager, which leverages VSS to take the required snapshots while keeping the target machine online. However, it’s required to remove the VMware client tools first, which will probably require a reboot anyhow.

 

References:

 

VMM P2V
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc764232.aspx
Troubleshooting P2V

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/439.vmm-troubleshooting-p2v-conversion-issues.aspx

 

Reference:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967435.aspx

Download:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=34591